Monday, May 13, 2019

TV Series Opening 34: Doom Patrol


OK, I just started to watch the first episode, but godsdamn, the opening credits are BEAUTIFULLY done.

Thursday, April 11, 2019

TV Series Opening 33: Texas Rising


A miniseries directed by Roland Joffé.
I won't lie. I watched it for Bill Paxton.

Saturday, April 06, 2019

Saturday Poetry Corner 10: Solitude


Today, a poem by Ella Wheeler Wilcox. THIS poem that probably half of the human population knows two first lines from.
Because I'm sad.

Saturday, March 09, 2019

Saturday Poetry Corner 9: The Rubaiyat

Illustration for The Rubaiyat from wikimedia

Today, some excerpts from The Rubaiyat by Omar Khayyam. One of the most talented scientists and poets.
Umar Khayyam was a polymath, scientist, philosopher, and poet of the 11th century CE. Whereas his mathematical works and poetry have been the subject of much discussion, his recently edited and published philosophical works have remained a largely neglected area of study. In what follows, we shall review and comment on the salient features of Khayyam’s poetry and philosophy, their relationship with one another, and Khayyam’s pioneering views on mathematics.
Traditionally, Umar Khayyam’s significance in the annals of Islamic intellectual tradition is due to, his Rubā‘iyyāt (quatrains) and his scientific works, especially those in the field of mathematics. The latter have always been overshadowed by his poetry. In recent years, critical editions of the philosophical works of Khayyam have been published which not only provide us with an insight into his philosophical thought but also provide a context for a more philosophical interpretation of the Rubā‘iyyāt.
In his Rubā‘iyyāt, Khayyam challenged religious doctrines, alluded to the hypocrisy of the clergy, cast doubt on almost every facet of religious belief, and appears to have advocated a type of humanism. It is no wonder that some referred to him as the “Eastern Voltaire” (Dole 1901, 81). This Western image, solidified by the Victorian sense of the exotic, romantic, and often erotic notions attached to the East, was echoed through the rendition of the Rubā‘iyyāt by Edward FitzGerald in the 19th century.
 (from: Stanford Encyclopaedia of Philosophy)


Wednesday, March 06, 2019

TV Series Opening 32: The Black Sails



Oh man, that series was a blast! It had blood, treason, fights, sex, dirt! Everything that a growing pirate needs.

Monday, March 04, 2019

TV Series Opening 31: Da Vinci's Demons


I do have my reservations about the series, but anyway, the opening is nice.


Saturday, March 02, 2019

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Monday, February 25, 2019

TV Series Opening 29: Vikings


This series is not for those who faint at the faintest sign of blood.
Cause here it's not the faintest...

Sunday, February 24, 2019

TV Series Opening 28: The Game of Thrones



OK, I do have an ambiguous stance on the series, but the opening IS really well made and powerful.